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with a scenario where a law-abiding citizen might need more than 10 rounds to protect their family? >> it makes it easier for individuals to commit grievous acts of violence. >> do you agree that mentally ill people should not have more than one bullet? >> yes. >> do you agree that there may be mothers who need more than six? >> we need to be respectful of people's right to defend themselves -- >> the point is that i can envision a situation where, like in atlanta, someone broke into her home and she shot the guy 5 or 6 times and he was still able to get up and out the door. i don't think criminals will be limited by any capacity magazine size law, and if you start restricting the amount of the ten-shot limit in some circumstances, that may disadvantage law-abiding citizens and not do much to the criminal. on the number of people are prosecuted, how many people a year failed a background check? >> i believe in 2012 it was 80,000. >> how many were false positives? >> a small percentage. i am not certain. when you say "false positives," what do you mean? >> you are entitled to a gun but the syste
of the new law, but the second part of the law. that is expanding access to affordable coverage so more individuals can access care from the outset. this is a goal that the ama and america's doctors have supported for decades. you, better than anyone, understand the consequences of going without health insurance. you see it in patients who do not fill the prescriptions you wrote, because they cannot afford it. you see it in the woman who shows up in the emergency room, consequences from a cancer that could have been and should have been caught early. you see it in families saddled with medical bills, they will spend their entire life trying to pay off. you see it in a burden that many of you take on, day in and day out, to provide care to the uninsured. the uninsured americans in this country have never been invisible to america's doctors. that is why you help in the fight that will finally bring america into the ranks of nations that make coverage affordable to all their citizens. because of your efforts, beginning on october 1 of this year, millions of uninsured americans across the c
came up with a superb choice. justice sandra day o'connor. i had hoped when i was in law school that i would be able to get the job as a lawyer. [laughter] i was told the story but we had a woman lawyer once and she was dreadful. [laughter] how many men lawyers did you have? that did not turn out well? [laughter] the change i have seen in my lifetime is exhilarating and the change in the federal judiciary is to the credit of president jimmy carter. >> speaking of your female colleagues, after justice sandra day o'connor retired in 2006, your the only thing of justice on the supreme court until justice sonia sotomayor joined the court in 2009. justice elena kagan followed, joining the court in 2010. you are now one of three women on the supreme court. can you compare for us your experience as the only woman on the court with that of being one of two female justices and that of being one of three female justices? >> the national association of women judges forecast what would come so they have a reception for the justice o'connor and me in the fall of 1993 and they gave us t-shirts. [lau
nexus' lexus for pencils for her law clerks. in ohio, you cannot finally pleading unless you bring your own paper. in new hampshire, the court closed the courts to all civil jury trials for a year, a year. alabama supreme court justice said she is going to have to reduce civil trials by 50% and criminal cases by 1/3. well, we have spent $1.30 trillion in bringing the rule of law to parts of the rest of the world. the rule of law begins with one word. "access." access. if there is no access, there is no rule of law. today we have a just a step in this country where 80% of poor people do not have access to the port. -- court. we have a legal services corporation that is so under- funded, one out of every two phone calls go unanswered. we have not only the traditional minority poor, we have the newly poor. the foreclosure crisis has caused a vast new number of people to cannot support to go into court. even if they could afford it, if the courts are closed, there is no access. there is no access. around the country, the courts are closing down. the head of the civil division in los angeles
americans because they looked like the enemy. the law says we can arrest anyone who looks like san franc and i reside in district 9. i want to thank supervisor chiu. i want to say a couple of things of why the mba and resolutions. you're going to hear from other people testifying behind me today. we could see indefinite military action of things that are indefined in the law. resolutions make the law clear. the law passed without a real debate in the law. and even when the law went to committee we have not seen the kind of debate from an unconstitutional law that can effect our rights under the 5 accounting and 6th and 8th amendment which presents certain things about our troops. and san francisco - i just want to point out that karen spoke a little bit about our faggots story when he has her father was held in san francisco county jail. it's very real and the issue a very real. there's a wide variety of the communities supporting it. we have community - people from community supporting it and next speaker >> i want to thank the members of the board of supervisors who were supporting th
by a professor geoffrey hazard, a distinguished professor of law at uc hastings. the professor is a leading expert in the field of civil procedure of legal ethics and is good at asking questions. it is my pleasure to introduce our very special guest, stephen zack, president of the american bar association. with nearly 400,000 members, it is the largest volunteer professional membership organization in the world. mr. zack is the first hispanic american to serve as the president and the second to be born abroad. he was only 14 when his family emigrated from cuba under harrowing circumstances, including last minute detention by the secret police. he made it here. in two lines -- and two lines come to mind when i think of him. "this is my country, land of my choice. this is my country, here i found voice." what a voice it is. he earned his aba at the university of florida and he is now in their hall of fame. he is a partner in the miami office of the national law firm. his clients range from former vice president al gore to philip morris, to the national geographic society, and he is listed in
long advocated for jessica's law. back in 2005, nine-year-old jessica lunsford brutally raped and murdered in florida by a convicted sex offender named john cuey who never should have been out on the street. the justice department in florida allowed him to escape a fair punishment for his past deeds. after that murder, florida, texas and a number of other states quickly passed laws that sentenced child rapists to prison for decades, sometimes even for life. but some states were resistant. so we began to move. "the factor"'s campaign proved to be very effective, with 43 states eventually passing some version of jessica's law. just this month the two holdouts, new jersey and idaho, have begun to come around. february 12 in boise, a bill was introduced that would give child rapists an idaho a minimum of sentence of 25 years. we expect the good people of idaho to demand their politicians pass that bill. governor otter told us he will sign it. in new jersey, the state assembly voted yesterday 77-0 to pass jessica's law. we believe the senate will go along and governor christie has
items no. 1. >> item no. 1, prohibit sales of law enforcement ammunition. no. 2, police code require reporting 500 or more round >> these two items have been introduce by mayorly and supervisor co-hen. >> thank you very much. thank you. as many of you know i have joined with chief and other leaders to announce this legislation late last year. this has built upon to take on gun violence. ammunition, lethal ammunition. what the law doesn't restrict is it's possession. now we also have existing regulation that require anyone selling ammunition within the city limits maintain records of their sale which are required to be available for inspection at any time. but no city law requires any reporting of these types of sales by vendors that do not have locations inside the city and county of san francisco but sell to city residents. this is enforcing our existing our regulations. the first proposes to restrict not only the sale but possession of type of ammunition that is in lethal property designed for use by military personnel. anything sold black talent which was designed with sharp pro
you have 1000 law schools, you can open a law school for a couple hundred bucks, and they have a huge failure rate. we are working with the brazilians, other colleges, law schools. i spoke to their major university about these issues, and they are doing what they can to increase. i would tell them to make sure that the legal education is a quality legal education. it is the first of to have a monopoly, so you can control the lawyers, and make sure they are acting in an ethical way. i think there was a third part of the question, what would i tell them not to do. by the way, before i get to that, in vietnam, i recently met with the president of their bar association, similar to the american bar. in most countries, they have a government bar association that is part of the government, in effect. then they just have an non-club federated are. the person was a 70-year-old viet cong that was the chair. one of the most interesting conversations i ever had. someone who did not told anyanger, -- not hold any anger, but wanted information and help from america. the american bar associat
, the state of play in florida, which has some of the least restrictive gun laws in the u.s. >> nothing really truly equalizes a smal petite woman with someone who's 6'3, 230 pounds who's angry except a firearm. >> those weapons often times fall in the hands of bad folks in our communities. >> suarez: hari sreenivasan brings together high school students from across the country to talk about guns and violence. >> woodruff: and as oscar night nears, tony scott, movie critic for the "new york times," gives us his take on the latest buzz about wild cards and front runners. that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: ♪ ♪ moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. >> and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station fro
government health care for the poor; the ever more deadly syrian civil war; florida's liberal gun laws; teens on gun violence. plus, oscar wild cards and front runners. but first, the other news of the day. here's hari sreenivasan. >> sreenivasan: a new winter storm blasted its way across the nation's midsection today, bringing heavy snow, freezing rain and even thunder and lightning. weather warnings and watches extended to at least 20 states, from new mexico all the way to virginia. in parts of kansas and colorado the snow fell at a rate of more than two inches an hour. it caused whiteout conditions, shutting down highways, schools and some state legislatures. forecasters said the system will push on to the great lakes and appalachians, with a spin-off storm dumping heavy snow on new england. the snowfall in the plains brought some relief to the drought stricken region, but not enough. in fact, government climate experts warned the drought is likely to continue through at least spring. drought conditions are also expected to spread to california, texas and florida. currently, just over half
there are different needs in different communities? and i think perhaps the law enforcement folks feel the cultures in the communities and see that come out in the adults. i would like to hear about how do you affect a culture and even in san francisco we have many cultures affecting what is valued, what is criticized. >> you know i think that richard touched upon this. it's a relationship of power and it's clearly going to differ from community to community; right. when i was telling you i was picked because because i didn't speak english or at all initially there were only about 5% of us that were hispanic in the school and wouldn't be the case if 95% are hispanic and english speaking as a second language, but i think the way that we can deal with the issue is we ought to first of all start with the notion of respect for others, and respect for others can work across the line. it doesn't necessarily mean -- it doesn'tly has to deal with the culture. is how we treat one another? and i think we have to be very clear in our educational process and the communication to our people and what is accep
. >> commissioner honda the issue of illegal units that pre dominate the city, a property owner under california law is not permitted to take rent from an illegal unit that is discourage from the tenant. when the property learns that he or she has an illegal unit, it is encumbent to take action. my client learned of the status of the units when he hired him when he came to the city and explained to him that he had a single family dwelling. he promptly did what was legally required of him to seek a permit to clarify the legal use of the property. if there is any suggestion, implications, thought, about limiting my clients' rights under state law as a condition of the permit. imposing some sort of rent control on this unit and limiting my rights to go out of the rental business. and i strongly urge you to seek legal, the case law is in favor of my client that the board cannot limit my clients rights under the rental housing right and the board does not have the authority to limit my client's right to go out of the rental business if that is his choice. and the suggestion that we agree to that is illeg
. >> right unless another motion is ready the jurisdiction request is denied by operation of law. >> right. >> okay. >> okay. >> that's fine. all right. so commissioners do you want me to move onto item five or take up items 10a and b? >>i would like to move to item five and after that item i would like to take a break. >> okay. we will call item five appeal no. 12-146 and mary amil san francisco palm reader and 247 columbus avenue appealing the denial of fortuneteller permit. this is on for hearing today. mr. fisher representing the appellant. you have seven minutes. >> thank you. good evening president hwang and members. i represent mary amil and who has told fortune for years. no san francisco fortuneteller law existed in the city until the end of 2003 and after full investigation of mary amil the sfpd granted the yearly license to her which would have been automatically renewed again in 2010 except the payment deadline was missed requiring a new application for which identification she used her 2005 expired dmv id and the fortuneteller license issued by the sfpd after full inv
the new law imposing major cuts to aid for the unemployed. jobless benefits will be cut by nearly one-third and recipients will have less time to collect them. in addition to gutting state benefits, the bill also rejects millions of dollars in additional federal aid. it north carolina currently has the nation's fifth highest official unemployment rate at 9.2%. the measure takes effect july 1. in a statement, the north carolina justice center denounced republican governor pat mcqueary's and state lawmakers saying -- a death row prisoner in georgia has been granted a last-minute stay of execution. warren hill was set to be put to death for the murder of a fellow prisoner while serving a life sentence for fatally shooting his girlfriend. but federal -- but a federal appeals court granted a last- minute reprieve citing expert opinion hill is mentally disabled. all three doctors who originally said hill failed to meet the legal definition of mentally retarded have since reversed their opinion. hill would have been the first prisoner executed in georgia since troy anthony davis in 2011. it
really act as a good communicator and facilitator in the program from a law enforcement background. and the grant we get through public works really allows us to run effectively. >> great, thank you. >> [speaker not understood]. let me come on over here. what's your question? >> okay. [speaker not understood]. i've gotten three years of knowledge [speaker not understood]. my question is this. how am i going to get the police department, how am i going to get city council -- they're partially on board, but some of our people in public works are here today. how can i convey to them that i'm not a nut -- everybody here thinks i'm a nut because [speaker not understood]. how did they really take this seriously and realize that graffiti is a crime and it requires money and it requires attention from the officials, not just from covering graffiti? is there an answer? can you give me some sort of -- what's a good direction? >> [speaker not understood]. >> [speaker not understood]. basically the task force, they'll put together and try to convince the citizens something is happening, then i
of the best legal libraries in the world. coaching and has said -- has built a law school that has no books. we're working with those countries to provide them with legal materials because they have been asking. they also ask for lawyers to help them with their loss students -- loss students -- law students. we have reached out to see if we can do some exchange program. what i tell them not to do, i think that they ought to not -- the same thing i said earlier. they ought to try to find the separation of funding issues that the government needs to make it not a political system. they need to look at what is adequate. in these countries, access seems to be the biggest issue. they ask me about access. it is ironic that we have our own access issues, which we talked about earlier, but they are very concerned about not having sufficient access to the legal system for their citizens. >> the problem of under- nourishment, so to speak, of the justice system is one aspect. you have talked about, is it that the trial level, the original access to justice? some one here has written, are there similar
summary of the laws. the ada, calif. building code, the civil rights, and our experts here will elaborate. we also have a list of certified caps at work in san francisco for you. carla johnson with the mayor's office of disability has created a really good it died of out to interview your experts to make sure you are getting the best quality product for you. been next -- the money you pay for the inspection you can take as a tax deduction. any money that if you have taken can be applied as a tax deduction. this can be done on an annual basis. next, the opportunity, and a fund -- opportunity loan fund, providing for small businesses to pay for the inspection or to make improvements needed. to do it before you receive the lawsuit. and lastly, we of the bar association and their resources. they're providing their legal service for you. this last thing i am going to share with you in terms of what we have seen in our office is that with the individuals, that does not necessarily mean an individual will follow up with a lawsuit. what we've seen in our office is the individual's will send you a
process. the law san francisco gives the citizens the right whente it they have been deadline the opportunity to make public comment, the avenue of going to the sunshine ordinance task force and asking for their assistance. but what good does to do you? you go there and get the orders of determination, and yet, other city agencies including this body, just ignore those determinations. know your rights under the sunshine ordinance is printed on every agenda of every commission and board in this city and every meeting. and yet when people who actually do know their rights under the sunshine ordinance and come before the bodies and simply ask to have their constitutional rights respected, for heaven's sake, they get met with open hostility. i went to a meeting, a public meeting earlier this month. and every time i got up to speak one of the commissioners simply crossed his arms across his chest and rolled his chair away from the deis and back into the corner. and when i get done speaking he came back to the table. and you say well, yeah, mr. hart, you deserve that. no member of
discipline, but holly has come up with a really wonderful solution within law enforcement that we would love you to talk about and it's preventive and solution. >> thank you. it's not going to be a shock to you that i don't have a sizzle reel but i did manage to get a few powerpoint slides in so it's a good thing if i can get my next one. can you advance it for me please? so it is a safety course that i created with yahoo. we partnered together. i started asking questions the first day so my boots are on the ground and i'm in the schools and i love doing what i do, and i believe wholeheartedly and i believe it was the soft power -- yes, i love it. i think it's effective in so many ways, so i had luckily teamed up with the right people at yahoo who were really amazing and just the foresight they saw, and believed in the concept that law enforcement needs to be a piece of this puzzle and have some solutions. we have a unique part in the schools and with kids and this did get certified for the peace officer standards and we get credit for that being police officers and our training and o
donkey, or lack thereof. i love the picture. it reminded me of a priceless letter he sent to me in law school when he was over there in the peace corps. chris wrote wonderful notes and told me when he went running in the village where he was staying, only to have locals come up beside him and say where is it, where did it go. where is what? your donkey. i don't have a donkey. >> why are you running? [ laughter] >> for exercise. >> exercise? are you nuts? if you want exercise, come work on my orchard, you crazy american. >> chris succeeded because he knew how to laugh at himself and relate to people around him. there are two more memories i want to share. one deals with government and jazz. chris always wanted to work for the state department. he always wanted to be involved in the foreign service. he took the foreign service exam when we were undergrads at cal. he came back the first time, pleased with results on the written but felt he didn't do so well on the orals. the question that seemed to trip him up and left him perplexed was the following. mr. stevens, please compare american
complain about children being killed and we want to change laws that do not pertain to things that are really driving the killers, such as these videogames and removing christ from school, and then they want to go back to the schools to pray after the shootings, which is just -- it is also crazy -- it is all so crazy. host: what type of work do you do in tulsa? caller: i am a disabled veteran, for about 10 years now. host: prior to that? caller: i was a tree surgeon. host: can you define what that is? caller: a person who cares for trees, diseases, structure, cultivation, in the urban landscape particularly. host: thank you, sir. from "the chicago sun-times," "the harder they fall." here is "the chicago tribune." " jacksons guilty trail of excess." jesse jackson junior pleads guilty. "i lived off my campaign." "jesse jackson junior pleaded guilty wednesday to one felony fraud count in connection with his connection of use of 700 $50,000 in campaign money to pay for living expenses and by items like -- of 750,000 dollars in campaign money to pay for living expenses. the federal
and tougher laws. the suspected criminals this activist is investigating, he says the politicians are evading justice. >> our judicial system, it takes such a long time. they have been in the seat of power, where they can delay cases not just for years, but for decades. >> we have come to the indian heartland. it is one of the engines of indian politics, controlling the most number of seats in parliament. down the line from delhi, there is this small town. the name means "jewel," and here, this man is king. he is a minister in the state government. but he has also been charged with a gang rape. six years later, there has been no prosecution or movement in his case. we find him at his home with his constituents, hearing pleas for help. he says the rape charge has been fabricated by his rivals. >> this charge is a conspiracy against me. it was slapped on me during the last government. it is ridiculous. but before the election, people knew about it. that is why i won by 30,000 votes. >> a lot of people find it hard to understand how ministers, such as yourself, and other politicians can a whole
law institute test because he could not control his behavior, congress in most state jurisdictions changed the law, got rid of the lack of emotional test, the a.l.i. test and now in most jurisdictions, the nontest requires that you demonstrate that you can't distinguish right from wrong. so now we have, and again, the law uses science for the law's own purposes, but what is problematic here is the disconnect. from the criminal side, if you lack emotional control, you go to prison because you can't win under the test because the test doesn't apply. when you walk out of prison and you lack emotional control, you get civilly committed. so what we have is a fundamental disconnect between how we view philosophy of free will and human control on the criminal side versus the civil side and not surprisingly on both sides "the state wins" because on the criminal side you go to prison and on the civil side, you get incarcerated civilly. >> i don't think that's much of a disconnect. i think -- so i agree with you the test has changed. that's not what i'm talking about. if you look at the kind
's law in honor of her, she had been in and around sacramento for a long time. so the legislation in and of itself, i don't think it's going to work miracles, but it is definitely on people's radar now and i think you hear it in the media more and more. the reason we have a suicide barrier and the reason we are having legislation like this is because of the parents and the families because they are the ones that hurt the most and i would imagine part of the therapeutic thing, you've got to tell this story and telling it in the right place and the right time can be very effective. so seth's law does require that if you witness an act of bullying, that you must report it. >> is that for anybody? >> anyone, but particularly teachers. there is a -- sometimes we see things that aren't very pleasant and if you've ever taken it to muni, you know what i mean. your tendency is to turn away. i heard the word faggot on the play ground when i taught. the teachers were intimidated, they didn't want to be seen to have any empathy because that might reflect on them. it's crazy but that's p
with local law enforcement who had gone into schools talking about bullying, including cyber bullying and giving people concrete examples of things of situations they saw, it was remarkable. and that is why we will continue to do that work. so i hope today as we move forward you will understand that we are in this together with you at the department of justice. this is an all hands on deck enterprise. there is so much to do. i hope at the end of this day we will indeed all follow the lead of that student, walk out and say what are one or two things i'm going to do differently and better? how are we going to improve this situation? i hope if you take one and only one thing from melinda and my and ruslyn's remarks today, if you have an idea, please bring them to us. we want to learn from you. we are in this together and i want to say thank you because the most important thing we have is a recognition that you understand that this is indeed a national issue for us to deal with. i'm looking forward to the rest of the day, i appreciate your presence and i appreciate your leadership
to push that rock up the hill and get people to actually follow the law. for example, this body in my 150-word summaries, when i had four orders of derrillation from the sunshine ordinance task force, all of which were ignored until at some point somebody made a decision that my 150-word summaries would go into the minutes as required by law. there is no explanation about that, simply changed. so now i have got one issue being handled by four different commissions in four different ways. trying to get documents is one of the most frustrating things that a citizen in this city has to deal with. you want to get involved in the public issue. you want to get, in particular, financial records. and yet, city employees in this case, or in my case, louis herrera, the city librarian used his office to withhold public records from me. he just basically didn't want it made apparent to the public that all the claims that they were making at library commission meetings had no basis. but $10 million that was claimed as a gift to the branch library improvement program was just that, nothing, but claim.
a proposed law that would reduce felony drug possession crimes to a misdemeanor. this is what 13 states have done. we not only bring these issues to the forefront, but have the opportunity to participate -- and we have cards that you could fill out and questions. this promises to be a year of reform and change like we have never seen, and we now see prisoner reentry programs being implemented. we're still spending too much money and resources and not enough on rehabilitation and reentry. this november, the voters will decide on limiting the three strikes law. issues and measures long overdue. it is clear there is much more that needs to be done. according to a study that was published this month -- since 1989, 2000 people have been wrongfully incarcerated and they served collectively, 10,000 years. an average of 11 years person. i would like to thank the people who made this summit possible. memoranda -- amy devon -- many volunteers and all of our speakers and panelists. i would like to thank the co- sponsors, and the bar association of san francisco. i would like to thank them for their hel
, to say that he's been law enforcement for 30 years and bring back 30-year experience to this consideration of this bill, and he said this bill makes sense because drug treatment works and this is in spite of the fact we'll be battling the district attorneys along with many other arms of public safety. [laughter] >> we've got the data, we've got the facts and we know this will provide great benefit to our communities, to our neighborhoods, and to all of california. thank you for your support. [applause] >> tal, i want to go back to the question that marty posed earlier, which is in effect this idea that in order to incentivize people making the decision to seek treatment that the fear of a felony conviction or possible state prison sentence could play a positive role. you talk to a lot of people charged with crimes who are trying to make the decision of what decision to make, what is the primary motivation you see coming from them. how do they decision make on dispositions related to drug possession as a felony? >> i think that for a lot of people it does have to be a
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 2,097 (some duplicates have been removed)

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